Trump mucks about with water rule; the ducks of winter

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Trump mucks about with water rule; the ducks of winter

Trump ignores Supreme Court ruling in EO to roll back Clean Water Act protection: “Many had expected Trump to roll back Obama’s Clean  Water Rule and revert to the  Bush-era rule which relied on Justice Kennedy’s controlling decision in the 4-1-4 split decision in the 2006 Rapanos case — requiring that for a water to be covered under the Clean Water Act’s jurisdiction it must have a ‘significant nexus’ with navigable waters.  The Obama rule relied on that same legal standard but used an extensive scientific review to determine that broad classes of tributary streams and wetlands that are hydrologically connected to navigable waters but that do not flow year round do indeed have a ‘significant nexus’ and are covered by the Clean Water Act. But President Trump’s Executive Order doesn’t just start the process of repealing the Obama-era rule — he goes further and directs his agencies to consider using the minority standard espoused by the late Justice Scalia in the Rapanos case.  Scalia’s approach would limit the Clean Water Act’s reach to perennial streams and lakes — those that (essentially) flow or are present all the time — and to the wetlands with direct surface flow consistently connecting them to those perennial streams or lakes where the boundary between stream and wetland is difficult to discern.  He would remove from the Clean Water Act’s reach the seasonal and intermittent streams that represent about 60% of stream miles nationwide, and in my home state of Colorado are 75% of our stream miles.”

 “Community supported agriculture (CSA) began in the USA in the 1980s in New England.  In a CSA, customers buy shares in the produce of a local farm before growing season and receive a bundle of foodstuffs and agricultural products regularly as the harvest comes in. Anthony Graham, a farmer for over 30 years at the Temple-Wilton Community Farm in New Hampshire, one of the original CSAs, said, ‘When we started the Temple Wilton Community Farm, we were interested in community and in the “culture” of agriculture. What we were attempting to set up was a way for a community of people to support the existence of a farm through good times and bad by making pledges of financial support over the course of one year. By agreeing to support the existence of the farm our members became co-farmers.’ Today, there are over 7,500 healthy, sustainable community farms working in the USA, and thousands more in Canada.”